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Date: 07-06-2020

Case Style:

STATE OF OHIO v. LAMAR L. CARTLIDGE

Case Number: 13-19-44

Judge: John R. Willamowski

Court: IN THE COURT OF APPEALS OF OHIO THIRD APPELLATE DISTRICT SENECA COUNTY

Plaintiff's Attorney: Stephanie J. Kiser

Defendant's Attorney:

Need help finding a lawyer for representation for appealing the judgment of the Seneca County Court of Common Pleas, alleging (1) that his conviction is not supported by sufficient evidence; (2) that his conviction is against the manifest weight of the evidence; (3) that he was denied his right to the effective assistance of counsel; (4) that the trial court erred in ordering him to pay courtappointed counsel fees; and (5) that the trial court erred in denying his motion to dismiss for violation of his speedy trial rights in Ohio?

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{¶2} On September 10, 2018, several law enforcement officers met L.S., a
confidential informant, at a predetermined location to set up a controlled buy of
illegal narcotics. Tr. 120. Detective Sergeant Donald Joseph (“Detective Joseph”)
conducted a pre-operational search of L.S.’s person. Tr. 124, 141, 165, 217. L.S.
was then outfitted with recording devices and given $60.00 of covert funds. Tr.
122, 124, 165, 226. The police recorded the serial numbers of the bills that were
issued to L.S. Tr. 138. L.S. informed the law enforcement officers that she had
arranged a meeting with Cartlidge to purchase heroin in the parking lot of the public
library in Fostoria. Tr. 123, 164, 173, 227.
{¶3} Detective Charles Boyer (“Detective Boyer”) dropped L.S. off at a
location in the vicinity of the public library in Fostoria and then proceeded to
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conduct visual surveillance of the operation. Tr. 227. After she got out of the police
car, L.S. walked to the parking lot of the public library where she got into the back
of an SUV. Tr. 174. L.S. testified that Cartlidge was sitting in the front seat of the
passenger side of this vehicle. Tr. 190. She stated that there was a child in the
vehicle and that a woman entered the vehicle while she was there. Tr. 174, 190.
{¶4} L.S. testified that she put $60.00 on the console and that Cartlidge then
told her the drugs were on the back seat of the vehicle. Tr. 175. L.S. stated that she
saw a “little silver package” sitting on the seat. Tr. 175. She took the package and
left the vehicle. Tr. 175-176. Detectives Boyer and Joseph then followed the
vehicle that L.S. had entered to a Kroger Fuel Mart and then to an apartment
complex. Tr. 218, 229. Both detectives were able to identify Cartlidge when he
exited the vehicle at the apartment complex. Tr. 218, 229. L.S. returned to the
police and gave the officers the silver package. Tr. 129, 176. The officers then
conducted a post-operational search of L.S.’s person. Tr. 129. The contents of the
silver package were later tested and found to contain fentanyl. Tr. 201.
{¶5} The police apprehended Cartlidge on September 12, 2018. Tr. 137.
Cartlidge was found with a cell phone and $522.00 in cash on his person. Tr. 137.
The cash on his person included a twenty-dollar bill that had a serial number that
matched one of the serial numbers that the police had copied from one of the bills
that had been issued to L.S. for use in the controlled buy. Tr. 138-139. Further, the
number that L.S. had called to contact Cartlidge matched the number of the cell
Case No. 13-19-44
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phone that was found in Cartlidge’s possession. Tr. 139-140. On September 12,
2018, Cartlidge was sentenced to a term of imprisonment for previous offenses that
are unrelated to the facts of this case. Sentencing Tr. 7. He was then imprisoned in
a correctional institution in the State of Ohio. Doc. 5.
{¶6} On September 26, 2018, Cartlidge was indicted on one count of
aggravated trafficking in drugs in violation of R.C. 2925.03(A)(1), (C)(1)(b);1
one
count of trafficking in heroin in violation of R.C. 2925.03(A)(1), (C)(6)(a); and one
count of corrupting another with drugs in violation R.C. 2925.02(A)(3), (C)(1)(a).
Doc. 1. On February 20, 2019, Cartlidge was served with this indictment at the
Marion Correctional Institution. Doc. 5. The record indicates that he remained in
imprisoned at the Marion Correctional Institution through the time of his trial. Doc.
5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 31, 44. On August 21, 2019, the State filed a motion to dismiss
the second and third counts listed in Cartlidge’s indictment. Doc. 32. The trial court
granted this motion to dismiss on August 22, 2019. Doc. 33.
{¶7} On August 22, 2019, the Defense filed a motion to discharge the
defendant for a violation of his speedy trial rights. Doc. 35. On August 26, 2019,
the State and the Defense met in the trial judge’s chambers. Doc. 36. The trial court
heard the Defense’s arguments regarding the alleged speedy trial violation and then

1
On August 15, 2019, the State filed a motion to amend the first count in this indictment to reflect a revision
of R.C. 2925.03. Doc. 27. In this motion, the State requested that the first count be changed from aggravated
trafficking in drugs in violation of R.C. 2925.03(A)(1), (C)(1)(b) to trafficking in a fentanyl related compound
in violation of R.C. 2925.03(A)(1), (C)(9)(b). Doc. 27. The trial court granted this motion on August 16,
2019. Doc. 28.
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denied the motion to discharge. Doc. 37. At this meeting, the Defense also alleged
that it had faxed a motion to suppress to the Seneca County Clerk of Courts on
August 20, 2019. Doc. 36. After the trial court inquired, the Seneca County Clerk
of Courts reported that it did not have a record of receiving this filing by fax. Doc.
36. The State did confirm that it received this motion to suppress via email. Doc.
36. The Defense then made an oral motion for leave to file out of time. Doc. 36.
The trial court denied this motion. Doc. 36.
{¶8} Cartlidge’s jury trial occurred on August 26, 2019. Tr. 1. On August
27, 2019, the jury returned a verdict of guilty on the charge of trafficking in a
fentanyl-related compound. Doc. 38. The trial court held Cartlidge’s sentencing
hearing on September 27, 2019. Doc. 41. The trial court issued its judgment entry
of sentencing on October 1, 2019. Doc. 41. On November 6, 2019, the appellant
filed a motion for a delayed appeal, which was granted by this Court.. Doc. 49. On
appeal, Cartlidge raises the following five assignments of error:
First Assignment of Error
Appellant’s conviction should be reversed because it was against
the manifest weight of the evidence.
Second Assignment of Error
Appellant’s conviction should be reversed because it was not
supported by sufficient evidence.

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Third Assignment of Error
Appellant was not provided effective assistance of counsel when
appellant’s attorney failed to timely file a motion to suppress.
Fourth Assignment of Error
The sentence should be reversed because the trial court erred in
ordering appellant to pay court-appointed counsel fees without
first considering appellant’s present and future ability to pay.
Fifth Assignment of Error
Whether the trial court erred when denying appellant’s motion to
dismiss for violation of a speedy trial.
For the sake of analytical clarity, we will consider Cartlidge’s second assignment of
error before we examine his first assignment of error.
Second Assignment of Error
{¶9} Cartlidge argues that his conviction for trafficking in a fentanyl-related
compound is not supported by sufficient evidence.
Legal Standard
{¶10} A challenge to the sufficiency of the evidence supporting a conviction
“is a question of law and a ‘test of adequacy rather than credibility or weight of the
evidence.’” State v. Beaver, 3d Dist. Marion No. 9-17-37, 2018-Ohio-2438, ¶ 40,
quoting State v. Berry, 3d Dist. Defiance No. 4-12-03, 2013-Ohio-2380, ¶ 19. “The
sufficiency-of-the-evidence analysis addresses the question of whether adequate
evidence was produced for the case to be considered by the trier of fact and, thus,
whether the evidence was ‘legally sufficient to support the verdict * * *.’” State v.
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Luebrecht, 3d Dist. Putnam No. 12-18-02, 2019-Ohio-1573, ¶ 36, quoting State v.
Worthington, 3d Dist. Hardin No. 6-15-04, 2016-Ohio-530, ¶ 12. On appeal, the
applicable standard
is whether, after viewing the evidence in the light most favorable
to the prosecution, any rational trier of fact could have found that
the essential elements of the crime were proven beyond a
reasonable doubt.
State v. Brown, 3d Dist. Hancock No. 5-17-19, 2018-Ohio-899, ¶ 8, quoting State
v. Plott, 2017-Ohio-38, 80 N.E.3d 1108, ¶ 73 (3d Dist.).
{¶11} In order to establish that Cartlidge committed the offense of trafficking
in a fentanyl-related compound in violation of R.C. 2925.03(A)(1), (C)(9)(b), the
State had to introduce evidence that he “[1] knowingly * * * [2] s[old] or offer[ed]
to sell * * *” “[3] a fentanyl-related compound * * *” [4] “in the vicinity of a juvenile
* * *.” R.C. 2925.03(A)(1), (C)(9)(b).
Legal Analysis
{¶12} In this case, L.S. testified that she had worked with the Seneca County
Drug Task Force as an undercover informant. Tr. 159. She stated that she had
known Cartlidge for several months and that he contacted her to tell her that he “was
back in town” on September 10, 2018. Tr. 163. After this interaction, L.S. testified
that she contacted Detective Bell and then arranged to purchase heroin from
Cartlidge. Tr. 164. L.S. testified that she met with the police at a predetermined
location; that her person was searched by the police; and that nothing was found on
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her. Tr. 165. L.S. stated that she was outfitted with a recording device and was
given sixty dollars to make a purchase in the controlled buy. Tr. 165.
{¶13} L.S. then stated that she called Cartlidge at this point and proceeded to
meet him at the library. Tr. 164, 166, 168, 173. The State offered a recording of
this conversation into evidence. Ex. 1. On this recording, a person, who L.S.
identified as Cartlidge, said, “Meet me at the library.” Ex. 1. She testified that the
police dropped her off in the vicinity of the local public library and that she walked
from where she was dropped off to the parking lot of the library. Tr. 174. In the
parking lot, she entered into the back seat of a “brown Blazer.” Tr. 174. She stated
that Cartlidge was sitting inside in the front passenger seat of the vehicle and that a
woman entered the vehicle at roughly the same time as she (L.S.) entered the
vehicle. Tr. 190. L.S. testified that, at the time she was in the vehicle with Cartlidge,
there was a child present. Tr. 174. She stated that this child appeared to be around
two years of age. Tr. 174.
{¶14} L.S. stated that she placed sixty dollars in cash on the console and that
Cartlidge told her that the drugs were on the back seat next to her. Tr. 175. She
said that she looked and saw a “little silver package” next to her. Tr. 175, 178. She
testified that she retrieved this package; left the vehicle; and met Detective Bell. Tr.
176, 178. She stated that she gave this package to the police; that she was searched;
and that no other contraband was found on her person. Tr. 176, 178. At trial, she
testified that she called Cartlidge to set up a controlled-buy of heroin; that Cartlidge
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told her where the drugs were on the back seat; and affirmed that no one else was
involved in this transaction. Tr. 175-176, 190.
{¶15} Detective Boyer testified that he had surveilled L.S. during the course
of the controlled buy and that he watched her enter a vehicle in the parking lot of
the public library. Tr. 227. He testified that he saw a child enter into Cartlidge’s
vehicle with a woman at the same time that L.S. entered into the vehicle. Tr. 228.
He testified that this child appeared to be under the age of four or five. Tr. 228. He
stated that, after L.S. exited the vehicle in the library parking lot, he continued to
follow this vehicle. Tr. 228. He testified that he watched this vehicle go to a fueling
station at Kroger’s and then to an apartment complex called the Governor’s Manor.
Tr 228-229. He affirmed that he saw a man exit the vehicle at the Governor’s Manor
and that he was able to “positively identify” this man as Cartlidge. Tr. 229.
{¶16} Detective Bell testified that L.S. was issued sixty dollars of covert
funds at the predetermined location to purchase the drugs in the controlled buy. Tr.
122. He also testified that L.S. gave him the drugs that she had purchased after the
controlled buy. Tr. 129. Detective Jim Chandler testified that he transported the
silver package and its contents to the Bureau of Criminal Investigations (“BCI”).
Tr. 208. Dr. Samuel K. Fortener (“Dr. Fortener”) works as a forensic scientist for
BCI. Tr. 193. He testified that the silver package in evidence in this case contained
“a white substance weighing 0.12 gram, plus or minus 0.04 gram * * *.” Tr. 201,
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204. He further testified that this white compound contained Fentanyl. Tr. 201. Dr.
Fortener also testified that Fentanyl is a Schedule II Drug. Tr. 196.
{¶17} In this assignment of error, Cartlidge asserts that the State was unable
to establish whether the compound examined at BCI and presented as an exhibit at
trial was the compound that L.S. obtained during the controlled buy. At trial, the
State questioned several witnesses regarding the chain of custody of this compound.
L.S. testified that she handed the compound in a silver wrapper to Detective Bell.
Tr. 177. Detective Bell stated that he placed this package into an evidence bag;
placed identifying markers on the bag; and prepared it for transport to BCI. Tr. 130-
131. Detective Jim Chandler (“Detective Chandler”) testified that he transported
the evidence to BCI. Tr. 207. Dr. Fortener testified about the protocols that
governed the handling of this evidence while it was at BCI. Tr. 197-199. Detective
Shawn Vallery (“Detective Vallery”) testified that he retrieved this evidence from
BCI. Tr. 211. Thus, the State produced some evidence that, if believed, establishes
the chain of custody for this drug compound.
{¶18} After reviewing the record in a light most favorable to the prosecution,
we conclude that a rational trier of fact could have found that the State had produced
some evidence to substantiate each of the essential elements of the crime of
trafficking in a fentanyl-related compound. The evidence produced at trial is legally
sufficient to support the challenged conviction. For this reason, Cartlidge’s second
assignment of error is overruled.
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First Assignment of Error
{¶19} Cartlidge argues that his conviction for trafficking in a fentanyl-related
compound is against the manifest weight of the evidence.
Legal Standard
{¶20} In a manifest weight analysis, “an appellate court’s function * * * is to
determine whether the greater amount of credible evidence supports the verdict.”
Plott, supra, at ¶ 73. Thus, “the appellate court sits as a ‘thirteenth juror’ * * *.”
State v. Davis, 3d Dist. Seneca No. 13-16-30, 2017-Ohio-2916, ¶ 17, quoting State
v. Thompkins, 78 Ohio St.3d 380, 387, 678 N.E.2d 541 (1997). Appellate courts
must review the entire record, weigh the evidence and all of the
reasonable inferences, consider the credibility of witnesses, and
determine whether in resolving conflicts in the evidence, the
factfinder ‘clearly lost its way and created such a manifest
miscarriage of justice that the conviction must be reversed and a
new trial ordered.’
State v. Brentlinger, 2017-Ohio-2588, 90 N.E.3d 200, ¶ 36 (3d Dist.), quoting
Thompkins at 387.
{¶21} “A reviewing court must, however, allow the trier of fact appropriate
discretion on matters relating to the weight of the evidence and the credibility of the
witnesses.” State v. Sullivan, 2017-Ohio-8937, 102 N.E.3d 86, ¶ 38 (3d Dist.),
quoting State v. Coleman, 3d Dist. Allen No. 1-13-53, 2014-Ohio-5320, ¶ 7. “[I]t
is well established that the * * * credibility of the witnesses [is] primarily a matter
for the trier of fact.” State v. Gervin, 2016-Ohio-8399, 79 N.E.3d 59, ¶ 142 (3d
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Dist.), quoting State v. Clark, 101 Ohio App.3d 389, 409, 655 N.E.2d 795 (8th Dist.
1995). “Only in exceptional cases, where the evidence ‘weighs heavily against the
conviction,’ should an appellate court overturn the trial court’s judgment.” State v.
Little, 2016-Ohio-8398, 78 N.E.3d 323, ¶ 27 (3d Dist.), quoting State v. Hunter, 131
Ohio St.3d 67, 2011-Ohio-6524, 960 N.E.2d 955, ¶ 119.
Legal Analysis
{¶22} Cartlidge advances four main arguments in support of his assertion
that his conviction is against the manifest weight of the evidence. We will consider
each of these arguments in turn. First, Cartlidge argues that L.S. is not a credible
witness. At trial, L.S. stated that she was working as a confidential informant in
exchange for consideration on a traffic ticket. Tr. 162. See Tr. 121. She also stated
that she was a recovering drug addict and was in treatment for her addiction at the
time of the trial. Tr. 161. She also admitted that she had convictions for
misdemeanor theft, complicity to breaking and entering, complicity to safe cracking,
and complicity to theft. Tr. 161-162. She stated that she did not receive any
consideration for these offenses in exchange for being a confidential informant. Tr.
162.
{¶23} We note that a number of L.S.’s statements at trial were corroborated
by the police officers involved in this operation and by various recordings. There
was a recording of a phone conversation between Cartlidge and L.S. from just before
L.S. went to the library. Ex. 1. Detective Bell testified that L.S. was searched at
Case No. 13-19-44
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the predetermined location before the controlled buy. Tr. 141. Detective Bell
testified that he conducted visual surveillance of L.S. as she walked to the library
and that he did not observe L.S. interact with anyone besides Cartlidge on this walk
or make any detours. Tr. 127.
{¶24} Detective Boyer testified that dropped off L.S. near the library and that
he observed L.S. enter a vehicle in the library parking lot. Tr. 227. He also testified
that he witnessed a woman and a child enter the vehicle at the same time as L.S. and
that he observed L.S. leave the vehicle after a short amount of time inside it. Tr.
218, 228, 232. Detective Joseph testified that he heard Detective Boyer state, over
the radio, that he saw a woman and a child enter the vehicle. Tr. 218. Detective
Joseph also testified that he watched L.S. walk away from the vehicle after the
controlled buy. Tr. 218.
{¶25} Detective Bell testified that he picked up L.S. “[i]mmediately” after
the controlled buy and that he searched her once they had returned to the
predetermined location. Tr. 127-129. He further stated that L.S. gave him the
package that she had obtained in the vehicle during the controlled buy. Tr. 129.
Detectives Joseph and Boyer testified that they followed the vehicle that L.S. had
entered and identified the person who exited this vehicle as Cartlidge. Tr. 153, 218-
219, 299.
{¶26} In the end, a “[m]ere disagreement over the credibility of witnesses is
not a sufficient reason to reverse a judgment on manifest weight grounds.” State v.
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Cervantes, 10th Dist. Franklin No. 18AP-505, 2019-Ohio-1373, ¶ 28, quoting State
v. Harris, 10th Dist. Franklin No. 13AP-770, 2014-Ohio-2501, ¶ 25. The jury was
“free to believe or disbelieve any or all of the testimony presented” by L.S. at trial.
State v. Crump, 190 Ohio App.3d 286, 2010-Ohio-5263, 941 N.E.2d 859, ¶ 26 (10th
Dist.).
{¶27} Second, Cartlidge points to the fact that the video recording device
with L.S. did not capture any footage of him in the vehicle during the controlled
buy. Tr. 187. Ex. 4. L.S. testified that the camera was in her hand and that she
could not position it to capture footage of Cartlidge without revealing the camera’s
presence. Tr. 173. However, L.S. identified Cartlidge as the person that she met in
the vehicle in the library parking lot. Tr. 162-163, 174, 178. Further, after the
controlled buy, two police detectives followed the vehicle that L.S. had entered and
were able to identify Cartlidge as the individual who exited the vehicle. Tr. 218-
219, 229.
{¶28} Thus, at trial, there were three witnesses who provided testimony that
placed Cartlidge in the vehicle in the library parking lot with L.S. Tr. 174, 218-219,
229. The jury, as the finder of fact, was “free to believe or disbelieve any or all of
[this] testimony * * *.” Crump, supra, at ¶ 26. The fact that the video recording
device did not capture footage of Cartlidge in the vehicle with L.S. does not mean
that his conviction is against the manifest weight of the evidence. See State v.
Chaffin, 4th Dist. Scioto No. 16CA3769, 2017-Ohio-7622, ¶ 36-37.
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{¶29} Third, Cartlidge asserts that there were two adults in the vehicle with
L.S. and that either one of them could have placed the drugs on the back seat or
received L.S.’s money. On cross-examination, L.S. stated that she did not see who
placed the package containing the controlled substance on the back seat. Tr. 186.
She also indicated that she did not give the money directly to Cartlidge but placed
the money on the console in the vehicle. Tr. 186. However, L.S.’s testimony
directly implicated Cartlidge as the individual with whom she set up this controlled
buy. Tr. 163-164, 172, 175, 178, 184, 188.
{¶30} At trial, L.S. testified that Cartlidge initially reached out to her, telling
her that he was “back in town.” Tr. 163. She stated that she called Cartlidge to set
up a controlled buy of heroin from him. Tr. 164, 184. She also called Cartlidge as
she was walking to the agreed-upon location for the controlled buy. Tr. 172, 178,
188. This call was recorded and played at trial. Tr. 166, 188. Ex. 1. While she was
in the vehicle, L.S. stated that Cartlidge told her where the drugs were and told her
to leave. Tr. 175. When the police apprehended Cartlidge, he had a phone that
matched the number that L.S. had used to contact him. Tr. 139-140. At the time of
his arrest, he also had, in his possession, one of the bills that L.S. was issued to use
in the controlled buy. Tr. 139. Ex. 7.
{¶31} At trial, L.S. also affirmed that no one else in the vehicle besides
Cartlidge participated in this controlled-buy transaction. Tr. 175-176. She testified
that she did not know the woman who entered the vehicle in the library parking lot;
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that she had never spoken with this woman; and that she did not interact with this
woman in setting up the controlled buy. Tr. 190. She further affirmed that she set
up the controlled buy with Cartlidge. Tr. 190. A jury could reasonably find, based
on this evidence, that Cartlidge was the person who had sold the drugs to L.S. See
State v. Smith, 193, Ohio App.3d 201, 2011-Ohio-997, 951 N.E.2d 469, ¶ 18 (3d
Dist.).
{¶32} In his fourth argument, Cartlidge points to an exchange between L.S.
and the State regarding the identification of the silver package she allegedly
obtained from Cartlidge. This exchange reads as follows:
[State]: And was that the same package that you turned over to
Detective Bell?
[L.S.:] This—it was in a silver gum wrapper, like it was in a
Trident gum wrapper, I’m sorry, but it’s not in—this is not in a
gum wrapper.
[State:] But you initialed that package?
[L.S.:] I initialed the plastic thing, I agree, but this is not—I’m
sorry. But this is—
[State:] Can we open it up, Your Honor—
[The Court:] Sure.
* * *
[State:] I’m not going to have her open up the smaller package
yet. It’s potentially dangerous. Would you prefer the witness to
open it or—
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[The Court:] No. Just let the record reflect, I mean everybody’s
watching. You can open it. * * *
* * *
[State:] I’m not going to cut any of the markings.

[State:] Is that easier to see now?
[L.S.:] No, it just looks like powder.
[State:] So that—
[L.S.:] Yeah, it just looks like—I don’t see—
[State:] You don’t see—do you see the original packaging that it
was in when you turned it over to Detective Bell?
[L.S.:] I can’t see it, I’m sorry.
[State:] That’s fine.
Tr. 178-180. Cartlidge asserts that this exchange indicates that the compound that
was examined at BCI was not the compound that L.S. gave to the police after the
controlled buy. However, at trial, the State questioned several witnesses to establish
the chain of custody for this piece of evidence.
{¶33} At trial, L.S. testified that she gave the silver package that contained
the drugs to Detective Bell after the controlled buy. Tr. 177. She testified that
Detective Bell then packaged it in the evidence bag and had her initial and date the
evidence bag. Tr. 178. During her testimony, L.S. was able to identify her initials
on the evidence bag but could not see the silver wrapper. Tr. 178-179. Detective
Bell also identified the evidence bag in the following exchange:
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[State:] Detective, I’m handing you what has been marked as
State’s Exhibit Number 2. Could you please take a look at that
and tell us what that is?
[Detective Bell:] State’s Exhibit Number 2 is the item that was
obtained during the controlled purchase operation TF-18-176 on
September 10, 2018; the item that was obtained by [L.S.] from
Mr. Cartlidge.
[State:] And how do you know that that’s the item turned over to
you from the confidential informant after the operation?
[Detective Bell:] I placed it into the bag. It also has our unique
markings. As you can see the white label here (indicating) is a
task force evidence label. This label is used by us for our in-house
system to make sure that these items from a specific case are
housed, and any time they leave or enter or there were more chain
of custody changes that bar code is scanned in order to keep that
control. This item also has the initials and date from the
confidential informant. Again, once it was placed into the
evidence bag I have that confidential informant initial and date
this bag. As well as the back, you can see my initials here
(indicating) that these items were opened by me after the
operation, and I put my initials here on the seal to show that I
conducted the opening of that.
[State:] Is the state’s exhibit in the same or substantially the same
condition as when you received it from the confidential informant
on September 10, 2018?
[Detective Bell:] Aside from the additional label and the markings
here on the seal, yes.
Tr. 130-131. Detective Bell then testified that this evidence was sent to BCI after
he put this package into the evidence bag. Tr. 131.
{¶34} The State also called Detective Chandler and Detective Vallery to
testify about the chain of custody for the drug compound. Tr. 207, 211. Detective
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Chandler testified that he transported this evidence bag to BCI. Tr. 208. He stated
that the bag was in his sole care and custody during the transport and that the
evidence bag was, at trial, in substantially the same condition as when he transported
it. Tr. 208-209. Detective Vallery testified that he retrieved this evidence bag from
BCI after the tests had been completed. Tr. 212. He further identified his initials
on the evidence bag and testified that the evidence was, at trial, in substantially the
same condition as when he retrieved it. Tr. 213.
{¶35} Dr. Fortener testified that he examined the contents of the evidence
bag at BCI and verified that the evidence bag at trial was from the Cartlidge case.
Tr. 197-199. The following exchange occurred while he was testifying:
[State:] Okay. And in this case, and I know you testified to it but
I apologize, it wasn’t that clear to me, what happened to the silver
package?
[Dr. Fortener:] So the silver package could be inside of this plastic
bag. Typically, think of a gum wrapper over time they kind of get
flimsy so they’re not as—as easy for them to contain a substance.
So to prevent any kind of spilling out into this plastic evidence
bag, we then place it inside a Ziploc bag so it’s more secure.
[State:] Before or after the test?
[Dr. Fortener:] After the testing was done. So we would have
opened it up. Inside this plastic bag would have been a foil gum
wrapper that would have been, the contents would have been
dumped out of that to be weighed and analyzed. They were then
placed back into that, folded up, and then put inside the Ziploc
bag that the laboratory provided to better secure the evidence for
return to the department.
[State:] So the silver then is there, the silver package is in there?
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[Dr. Fortener:] Yes, sir.
[State:] And can you see it in there?
[Dr. Fortener:] The plastic bag and Ziploc bag is folded up so
without actually opening up this bag, no sir.
Tr. 204-205. See State v. McFarland, 5th Dist. Muskingum No. CA-92-7, 1993 WL
35329, *4 (Jan. 15, 1993) (holding that a bag of drugs introduced as an exhibit was
“sufficiently identified” by the police and a forensic scientist from BCI even though
the confidential informant was unable to identify the bag of drugs).
{¶36} In this case, the State questioned a number of witnesses to establish
the chain of custody for this evidence. Further, the State also elicited testimony
from Dr. Fortener that offered a potential explanation as to why L.S. may not have
been able to identify the silver wrapper in the evidence bag while she was testifying.
Tr. 204-205. See State v. Brown, 107 Ohio App.3d 194, 668 N.E.2d 514, (3d Dist.
1995), citing McFarland at *4. From the testimony at trial, a jury could reasonably
find that the drugs in the evidence bag were the drugs that L.S. obtained during the
controlled buy.
{¶37} Having considered the evidence on the basis of its weight and
credibility, we conclude that this is not the exceptional case in which the evidence
weighs heavily against the conviction. The four arguments that Cartlidge raises in
this assignment of error do not establish that his conviction is against the manifest
weight of the evidence. Further, after reviewing the evidence in the record, we do
Case No. 13-19-44
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not find any indication that the jury lost its way and returned a verdict against the
manifest weight of the evidence. Cartlidge’s first assignment of error is overruled.
Third Assignment of Error
{¶38} Cartlidge argues that he was denied his right to the effective assistance
of counsel because his defense attorney did not file a motion to suppress.
Legal Standard
{¶39} “Under Ohio law, ‘a properly licensed attorney is presumed to carry
out his duties in a competent manner.’” State v. Harvey, 3d Dist. Marion No. 9-19-
34, 2020-Ohio-329, ¶ 57, quoting State v. Gee, 3d Dist. Putnam No. 12-92-9, 1993
WL 270995 (July 22, 1993). For this reason, the appellant has the burden of proving
that he or she was denied the right to the effective assistance of counsel. Brown,
supra, at ¶ 42. “In order to prove an ineffective assistance of counsel claim, the
appellant must carry the burden of establishing (1) that his or her counsel’s
performance was deficient and (2) that this deficient performance prejudiced the
defendant.” State v. McWay, 3d Dist. Allen No. 1-17-42, 2018-Ohio-3618, ¶ 24,
quoting Strickland v. Washington, 466 U.S. 668, 687, 104 S.Ct. 2052, 80 L.Ed.2d
674 (1984).
{¶40} In order to establish deficient performance, the appellant must
demonstrate that trial “counsel made errors so serious that counsel was not
functioning as the ‘counsel’ guaranteed the defendant by the Sixth Amendment.”
State v. Howton, 3d Dist. Allen No. 1-16-35, 2017-Ohio-4349, ¶ 35, quoting
Case No. 13-19-44
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Strickland at 687. In order to establish prejudice, “the defendant must show a
reasonable probability that, but for counsel’s errors, the result of the proceeding
would have been different.” Davis, supra, at ¶ 36, quoting State v. Bibbs, 2016-
Ohio-8396, 78 N.E.3d 343, ¶ 13 (3d Dist.). If the appellant does not establish one
of these two prongs, the appellate court does not need to consider the facts of the
case under the other prong of the test. State v. Baker, 3d Dist. Allen No. 1-17-61,
2018-Ohio-3431, ¶ 19, citing State v. Walker, 2016-Ohio-3499, 66 N.E.3d 349, ¶
20 (3d Dist.).
{¶41} “[F]ailure to file a suppression motion does not constitute per se
ineffective assistance of counsel.” State v. Madrigal, 87 Ohio St.3d 378, 389, 721
N.E.2d 52, 64 (2000), quoting Kimmelman v. Morrison, 477 U.S. 365, 384, 106
S.Ct. 2574, 2587, 91 L.Ed.2d 305, 325 (1986). To establish that counsel was
ineffective for failing to file a motion to suppress, the appellant must demonstrate
“that the motion [to suppress] would have been successful if made.” State v.
Kennedy, 3d Dist. Logan No. 8-18-01, 2018-Ohio-4172, ¶ 32. Beyond determining
the reasonable probability of success for a motion to suppress, courts consider
whether “the evidence, if excluded, would have changed the result of the trial.”
State v. McDuffie, 3d Dist. No. 9-2000-92, 2001 WL 542114, *2 (May 23, 2001).
Legal Analysis
{¶42} In his brief, Cartlidge points to the fact that his trial counsel had
prepared a motion to suppress but failed to verify that the trial court received this
Case No. 13-19-44
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motion.2
See Doc. 36. On appeal, Cartlidge asserts that, if this motion had been
granted, the items found in his possession at the time of his arrest would not have
been admissible at trial. Specifically, Cartlidge identifies his cell phone and the
twenty-dollar bill from the covert funds items that had been issued to L.S. would
have been suppressed. However, Cartlidge has not, on appeal, advanced an
argument that explains how the absence of these two items at his trial would have
changed the outcome of the proceeding.
{¶43} Even in the absence of this evidence, the testimony at trial still
established that, L.S. participated in a controlled-buy operation. Tr. 120, 159. The
police thoroughly searched her person before the controlled buy. Tr. 124, 151, 217.
While under police surveillance, L.S. went into a vehicle with sixty dollars of covert
funds. Tr. 122, 124, 227-228. While under police surveillance, L.S. returned from
this vehicle without the sixty dollars in covert funds and with a compound that

2
The motion to suppress purportedly argued that there was not probable cause for the arrest warrant that was
issued for Cartlidge. In his brief, Cartlidge represents that this motion argued that the arrest warrant
erroneously stated that there was video footage of Cartlidge engaging in a drug transaction. Appellant’s
Brief, 17. Cartlidge asserts that, if this motion had been successfully filed, the items found on his person at
the time of his arrest would have been suppressed. In response, the State asserts that the application for the
arrest warrant did not state that there was video footage of Cartlidge selling drugs in a controlled buy but
stated that video and audio recording devices were used during this controlled-buy operation. Appellee’s
Brief, 9. In this case, the record does not contain a copy of the application for the warrant to arrest Cartlidge.
For this reason, we cannot fully evaluate whether a motion to suppress would have had a reasonable
probability of success. However, this does not mean that we cannot evaluate this claim on appeal. In cases
where the appellant alleges that his or her trial counsel was ineffective for failing to file a motion to suppress,
there is not, as a general matter, a copy of the motion to suppress in the record because the alleged deficiency
was that the motion to suppress was not filed. In such a situation, the appellant identifies the evidence in the
record that would have been suppressed had a motion to suppress been filed. While we cannot make a
decision based on the record as to whether there was a reasonable probability that this motion would have
been granted, we can evaluate whether Cartlidge has demonstrated whether the outcome of his trial would
have been different in the absence of the evidentiary materials that he alleges would have been suppressed if
a motion to suppress had been filed and granted.
Case No. 13-19-44
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contained fentanyl. Tr. 127-129, 218. The police thoroughly searched L.S.’s person
after the controlled buy. Tr. 129, 141, 217. The police then followed the vehicle
L.S. had entered and verified that Cartlidge had been inside of that vehicle. Tr. 134,
137, 153, 218-219, 229.
{¶44} L.S. also testified that she had called Cartlidge to set up a time to
purchase heroin. Tr. 163-164, 190. There was an audio recording of L.S. calling a
person, who she identified as Cartlidge, to set up a meeting at the library for the
controlled buy. Tr. 166. Ex. 1. L.S. testified that Cartlidge was inside the vehicle
and told her where the drugs were on the back seat. Tr. 174-175, 190. She also
affirmed that no one besides Cartlidge was involved with her in this transaction. Tr.
190.
{¶45} Even assuming that a motion to suppress these evidentiary materials
had a reasonable probability of being granted, Cartlidge has not, on appeal,
advanced an argument that demonstrates how the absence of his cell phone and this
twenty-dollar bill as evidence at his trial would have led the jury to find him not
guilty. In failing to make such an argument, he has failed to carry the burden of
demonstrating how his rights were prejudiced by his trial counsel’s allegedly
deficient performance. For this reason, he has failed to establish an ineffective
assistance of counsel claim. Cartlidge’s third assignment of error is overruled.

Case No. 13-19-44
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Fourth Assignment of Error
{¶46} Cartlidge argues that the trial court erred by ordering him to pay for
his court appointed counsel without first considering his ability to pay these costs.
Legal Standard
{¶47} R.C. 2941.51 governs the imposition of court-appointed counsel fees
and reads, in its relevant part, as follows:
(D) The fees and expenses approved by the court under this
section shall not be taxed as part of the costs and shall be paid by
the county. However, if the person represented has, or reasonably
may be expected to have, the means to meet some part of the cost
of the services rendered to the person, the person shall pay the
county an amount that the person reasonably can be expected to
pay.
R.C. 2941.51(D).
[A] trial court’s order to pay court-appointed counsel fees is
distinguishable from both court costs and financial sanctions.
Court-appointed counsel fees and expenses approved by a court
are not court costs or a financial sanction, and they are not
directly enforceable as a criminal sanction. R.C. 2941.51(A); State
v. Springs, 2d Dist. Champaign No. 2015-CA-3, 2015-Ohio-5016,
¶ 9. R.C. 2941.51(D) specifically provides that court-appointed
counsel fees ‘shall not be taxed as part of the costs and shall be
paid by the county.’ Nevertheless, ‘if the person represented has,
or reasonably may be expected to have, the means to meet some
part of the cost of the services rendered to the person, the person
shall pay the county an amount that the person reasonably can be
expected to pay.’ R.C. 2941.51(D).
State v. Junod, 3d Dist. Mercer No. 10-18-08, 2019-Ohio-743, ¶ 66.
[A]n indigent defendant may properly be required to pay his
attorney fees only after the court makes an affirmative
determination on the record in the form of a journal entry that
Case No. 13-19-44
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the defendant has, or reasonably may be expected to have, the
means to pay all or some part of the cost of the legal services
rendered to him. The court must then enter a separate civil
judgment for the attorney fees or any part thereof that the court
finds the defendant has the ability to repay.
State v. Schaeffer, 3d Dist. Seneca No. 13-19-10, 2019-Ohio-2481, ¶ 8, quoting
State v. Shaffer, 3d Dist. Union No. 14-09-06, 2009-Ohio-4804, ¶ 5.
Legal Analysis
{¶48} As the State of Ohio concedes in its brief, the record in this case does
not contain any indication that the trial court made an affirmative determination that
Cartlidge had the ability to pay the costs of his court-appointed counsel fees or
considered Cartlidge’s present or future ability to pay these costs. See State v.
Parks, 3d Dist. Nos. 13-19-18 and 13-19-19, 2020-Ohio-145, ¶ 40. See Sentencing
Tr. 15. Doc. 41. Further, the trial court’s judgment entry of sentencing does not
contain a finding that Cartlidge has a present or future ability to pay for his courtappointed counsel fees. Doc. 41. See Schaeffer at ¶ 9.
{¶49} Thus, “we vacate that portion of the trial court’s judgment imposing
the court-appointed [counsel] fees and remand this matter for the trial court to either
conduct a hearing as to [Cartlidge’s] ability to pay the attorney’s fees pursuant to
R.C. 2941.51(D) or in the alternative, to file an amended judgment entry that omits
the imposition of those attorney’s fees.” Junod, supra, at ¶ 68. Cartlidge’s fourth
assignment of error is sustained.

Case No. 13-19-44
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Fifth Assignment of Error
{¶50} Cartlidge argues that the trial court erred in denying his motion to
dismiss for a speedy trial violation.
Legal Standard
{¶51} The United States Constitution and the Ohio Constitution guarantee “a
speedy trial to a person who has been accused of a crime.” State v. Hines, 3d Dist.
Marion No. 9-19-07, 2019-Ohio-5039, ¶ 11, citing State v. Jones, 148 Ohio St.3d
167, 2016-Ohio-5105, 69 N.E.3d 688, ¶ 11. Ohio has addressed a defendant’s right
to a speedy trial in several provisions in the Revised Code. R.C. 2945.71, et seq.
R.C. 2941.401. Ohio’s general speedy trial statutes are located in R.C. 2945.71, et
seq. State v. Irish, 2019-Ohio-2765, 140 N.E.3d 209, ¶ 12 (3d Dist.). Under R.C.
2945.71(C)(2), “[a] person against whom a charge of felony is pending * * * [s]hall
be brought to trial within two hundred seventy days after the person’s arrest.” R.C.
2945.71(C)(2).
{¶52} Where the general speedy trial statute is applicable, it “is mandatory
and must be construed strictly against the state.” State v. McRae, 3d Dist. Shelby
No. 17-17-23, 2018-Ohio-3435, ¶ 20. “This 270-day period may be extended for
one or more of the reasons listed in R.C. 2945.72(A)-(I).” Irish at ¶ 12. “Upon a
motion made prior to or at the trial, ‘a person charged with an offense shall be
discharged if he is not brought to trial within the time required by sections 2945.71
Case No. 13-19-44
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and 2945.72 of the Revised Code.’” State v. Pooler, 3d Dist. Logan No. 8-16-02,
2016-Ohio-5099, ¶ 21, quoting R.C. 2945.73(B).
{¶53} However, R.C. 2941.401 contains “a ‘specific’ speedy-trial statute
applicable only to defendants who are imprisoned in correctional institutions in the
State of Ohio and facing charges for crimes separate from those for which they are
already imprisoned.” Irish, supra, at ¶ 13. This provision reads, in its relevant part,
as follows:
When a person has entered upon a term of imprisonment in a
correctional institution of this state, and when during the
continuance of the term of imprisonment there is pending in this
state any untried indictment, information, or complaint against
the prisoner, he shall be brought to trial within one hundred
eighty days after he causes to be delivered to the prosecuting
attorney and the appropriate court in which the matter is
pending, written notice of the place of his imprisonment and a
request for a final disposition to be made of the matter, except
that for good cause shown in open court, with the prisoner or his
counsel present, the court may grant any necessary or reasonable
continuance.
* * *
The written notice and request for final disposition shall be given
or sent by the prisoner to the warden or superintendent having
custody of him, who shall promptly forward it with the certificate
to the appropriate prosecuting attorney and court by registered
or certified mail, return receipt requested.
The warden or superintendent having custody of the prisoner
shall promptly inform him in writing of the source and contents
of any untried indictment, information, or complaint against him,
concerning which the warden or superintendent has knowledge,
and of his right to make a request for final disposition thereof.
Case No. 13-19-44
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* * *
If the action is not brought to trial within the time provided,
subject to continuance allowed pursuant to this section, no court
any longer has jurisdiction thereof, the indictment, information,
or complaint is void, and the court shall enter an order dismissing
the action with prejudice.
R.C. 2941.401. Where applicable, this statutory provision is “mandatory and must
be strictly complied with by the trial court.” State v. Smith, 140 Ohio App.3d 81,
86, 746 N.E.2d 678, 682 (3d Dist.).
{¶54} “[W]hen a person who is imprisoned in an Ohio correctional
institution is charged with a crime separate from the crime for which they are
imprisoned, R.C. 2941.401 applies to the exclusion of R.C. 2945.71.” Irish, supra,
at ¶ 17. “Generally, for as long as such a defendant remains imprisoned in an Ohio
correctional institution, statutory speedy-trial time will not begin to run until the
defendant files a request for disposition in accordance with R.C. 2941.401.” Id.
Thus, “[w]hen a defendant is serving time in state prison, the speedy-trial time for
pending charges is tolled and R.C. 2941.401’s provisions prevail over conflicting
provisions of R.C. 2945.71.” Id. at ¶ 15, quoting State v. Charity, 7th Dist.
Mahoning No. 12 MA 214, 2013-Ohio-5385, ¶ 24. See R.C. 2945.71(F).
{¶55} On appeal, a speedy trial issue presents a mixed question of fact and
law. State v. Gartrell, 2014-Ohio-5203, 24 N.E.3d 680, ¶ 104 (3d Dist.).
“We accept the facts as found by the trial court on some
competent, credible evidence, but freely review the application of
the law to the facts.” State v. Kist, 173 Ohio App.3d 158, 2007-
Case No. 13-19-44
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Ohio-4773, 877 N.E.2d 747, ¶ 18 (11th Dist.). “The computation
of time for criminal statutes is governed by Crim.R. 45, which
provides, ‘[i]n computing any period of time prescribed * * * by
any applicable statute, the date of the act or event from which the
designated period of time begins to run shall not be included. The
last day of the period so computed shall be included * * *.’” State
v. Shafer, 3d Dist. Logan No. 8-14-28, 2015-Ohio-2469, ¶ 12,
quoting Crim.R. 45. ‘If any ambiguity exists, we construe the
record in favor of the accused.’ Id.
State v. Flynn, 3d Dist. Paulding No. 11-16-06, 2017-Ohio-1484, ¶ 10.
Legal Analysis
{¶56} On appeal, Cartlidge argues that the State failed to bring him to trial
within the 270-day period required under R.C. 2945.71(C)(2) and, in so doing,
violated his statutory speedy trial rights.3
However, it is undisputed that Cartlidge
had been imprisoned in an Ohio correctional institution on charges unrelated to this
case before he was indicted on September 26, 2018. Sentencing Tr. 7. Doc. 1, 5.
See R.C. 2941.401. See Charity, supra, at ¶ 25; Irish, supra, at ¶ 2. It is further
undisputed that he then remained in the custody of an Ohio correctional institution
from the date of his indictment through the date of his trial on August 26, 2019. Tr.
1. Doc. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 31, 44.
{¶57} Since Cartlidge was imprisoned for the duration of the time that this
charge was pending against him, “R.C. 2941.401 applied to the exclusion of R.C.

3
In his brief, Cartlidge argues that his constitutional speedy trial rights were violated because his statutory
speedy trial rights were violated. His arguments rest on the State’s alleged failure to comply with R.C.
2945.71, et seq. He does not raise any arguments that implicate the standard for constitutional speedy trial
right violations. For this reason, we will only perform the statutory speedy trial analysis.
Case No. 13-19-44
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2945.71 * * *.” Irish, supra, at ¶ 18. For this reason, “R.C. 2941.401’s provisions
prevail over [the] conflicting provisions of R.C. 2945.71” and operate to toll the
speedy trial time from accruing under R.C. 2945.71. Irish, supra, at ¶ 15, quoting
Charity, supra, at ¶ 24. Thus, contrary to the arguments in the appellant’s brief,
there is no time in between Cartlidge’s indictment on September 26, 2018 and his
trial on August 26, 2019 that would have accrued under R.C. 2945.71.
{¶58} For this reason, we will continue our analysis by considering the facts
of this case under R.C. 2941.401. The 180-day period in R.C. 2941.401 begins to
run when the incarcerated defendant “causes to be delivered to the prosecuting
attorney and the appropriate court in which the matter is pending, written notice of
the place of his imprisonment and a request for a final disposition to be made of the
matter.” R.C. 2941.401. In this case, there is no indication in the record that
Cartlidge caused such written notice to be delivered to the trial court or to the
prosecuting attorney. See State v. Hairston, 101 Ohio St.3d 308, 2004-Ohio-969,
804 N.E.2d 471, ¶ 24. Neither party contends that Cartlidge engaged in any efforts
to trigger the 180-day speedy trial time by complying with the process set forth in
R.C. 2941.401.
{¶59} As a result, the 180-day period allotted to the State in R.C. 2941.401
never began to run and did not expire before Cartlidge was brought to trial. See
State v. Mavroudis, 7th Dist. Columbiana No. 02 CO 44, 2003-Ohio-3289, ¶ 27;
State v. Hubbard, 12th Dist. Butler No. CA2014-03-063, 2015-Ohio-646, ¶ 39.
Case No. 13-19-44
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Thus, Cartlidge was brought to trial in compliance with the relevant statutory
provisions that govern an accused’s speedy trial rights.
{¶60} After examining the facts in the record, we conclude that Cartlidge’s
statutory right to a speedy trial was not violated. The record indicates that the charge
pending against Cartlidge was resolved by trial before the 180-day period prescribed
in R.C. 2941.401 had begun to run. Thus, the trial court did not err in denying
Cartlidge’s motion to discharge the defendant for a violation of his speedy trial
rights. Cartlidge’s fifth assignment of error is overruled.

Outcome: Having found no error prejudicial to the appellant in the particulars
assigned and argued in Cartlidge’s first, second, third, and fifth assignments of error, the judgment of Seneca County Court of Common Pleas is affirmed as to these
issues. Having found error prejudicial to the appellant in the particulars assigned
and argued in Cartlidge’s fourth assignment of error, the judgment of the Seneca
County Court of Common Pleas is reversed as to these issues. We remand this cause
to the trial court for further action consistent with this opinion.

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